Category Archives: Local Search

General information about Local Search techniques, technology and trends

Mike B Around the Local Web

In case you didn’t get enough of me this week here on my blog, you can overindulge in local  until you puke at these other fine publications:

Ductape Marketing: How to Get Found Using Ever-Changing Local SEO Tactics I have a fun conversation about Local with one of my favorite marketers, John Jantsch. We talk about all things local and how Google’s ranking algo works.

Streetfightmag.com: What Happens When Google Can Manipulate the Very News It Seeks to Protect? where “I howl against SkyNet’s wind”.

LocalU: Video Deep Dive: How Google determines authority of local entities a conversation with Mary Bowling about local entity authority. Also now available as a podcast:

LocalU: Video: Last Week in Local with Mary Bowling for the week ending April 10th. Also available on a weekly basis as both a podcast and an email newsletter.

 

The State of Internet Marketing for The SMB: Frustrated

Credits: Peter Alfred, under Creative Commons 2

I recently received this comment from poster Frustrated.  And it rang so true that I decided to track the writer down.

Frustrated is Marc Reisner of Reisner Construction in northern Michigan. He has moved around a bit; Colorado, Seattle and finally landed in Port Sanilac, MI. Turns out he had relatives from the Olean area so we had a long talk. He wants nothing more than to move out of home construction and into making custom furniture full time.

He thought he could do that with internet marketing. But the lack of knowledge opens up small businesses to this sort of problem that he writes about. They are vulnerable  while thinking that they are missing something that the cold caller is promising to deliver.

It is interesting that Google, by association, was tarnished with the same brush. It is not surprising that the over promising and under performing digital marketing hype plus the hard sell scammers, ended up hurting Google as well as everyone else in the space.

Here is Marc’s story:

*****

Marc Reisner’s (Reisner Construction) custom furniture

I was contacted by Yodle, then Townsquare Interactive, then Yelp. All 3 within a year.

Wanting to sell custom made furniture via the Internet, I fell for Yodle with anticipation of what they promised. After an initial discounted 6 months, no results….account closed and listing was pulled off the internet.

A week later TS calls. Their sales pitch was similar to Yodel, but they do not hold you to a predetermined period of time. 3 months, one call. I closed that account & lost a website.

Then, Yelp called. I explained to them my results with the first two and was lead to believe they were more established with a BBB rating and would create more business. I fell for it. They assured me they were the best. (I took notes on every conversation.) An initial monthly fee + $6 per click……meaning anyone calling my number listed on the internet I got charged $6/call. The number of calls that supposedly were dropped my me was unbelievable and I complained about it.

In looking at the actual phone numbers, I’d call the numbers Yelp listed and got the other side to answer with a recording, “The number you have called is not a working number.” The $425/month hit…..one contact via by one person, which looks like one real client.

It was a pain to actually close the account with Yelp with a closing fee of $450. They said they’d leave the account active for 2 months thinking I’d reconsider. One thing to do is set up your account with a credit card that is front loaded….put money into the card so you know how much will get spent, it’s like a debit card, but more protected from hackers. I closed the account.

Today, Google called to list my company for $600, but offered a one time discount dropping the fee to $399 for life….One time offer. I’d heard that before from them. I told them up front I’m not agreeing to sending any money today, I got this ‘that’s okay, I’ll just finish your company information’.

When done he went for the money via Cc #. I refused, so he said “I’ll get our finance manager on the line, he can help you. As soon as he said that, Bryce pipes in saying he had been listening to the call and could offer a better deal, $299 for life. I told him I didn’t have the money today…they hung up.

Word of mouth is the best advertising I’ve experienced over 35 years. Using the internet sounded appealing, so I figured I’d give it try hoping to find a good company to work with. I’ve not found one yet. I’ve learned a lesson that hopefully no one else will have to learn.

****

In a subsequent conversation where I asked if I could publish his name he noted:

As to the use of my name in your blog, I don’t see it as much of a problem.

It’s one of those “buyer beware” reality checks I think a lot of potential customers need when considering using an online advertising company that sells anyone the idea that “within 90 days you’re business will increase beyond expectation.”

Selling positive hype, rather than reality, should come with something only Townsquare Interactive gave, no contract.  I’ll give them credit for that.

I am very disappointed with the promises Yelp gave.  Deception at it’s best.

My Recent Posts Elsewhere

I have been busy. Here are my posts from an assortment of sites:

4/5 LocalU: Video Deep Dive: Local Ranking Factors, Making Sense Of It All (now also available as a regular podcast)

4/3 StreetFight: The Coming DIY Cataclysm

4/3 LocalU: Video: Last Week in Local April 3rd, 2017 (now also available as a regular podcast)

3/31 GetFiveStars: Understanding Google Schema Guidelines: Review Snippets vs. Critic Reviews       

3/29 LocalU: Video Deep Dive: How reviews positively and negatively impact client satisfaction (now available as a regular podcast)

3/29 GetFiveStars: Basketball Referee Calls Lead To Death Threats & Fake Reviews       

Yext – List your email everywhere‎

We recently embarked on a clean up campaign across the internet  for a client that had serious NAP issues. We used a corporate email address that forwarded to me. Somewhere along that line whether by hook or by crook or an errant check box, Yext picked up our email address.

And started spamming me.

7 days, 5 emails showing me exactly how problematic our listing is. While in some senses, this client is a qualified prospect, it is totally unclear how we managed to get subscribed to Yext’s email list and unclear why I now get almost one email a day from them.

I did send an inquiry off to Yext but they have not yet responded. Howard, whaz up?

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Continue reading Yext – List your email everywhere‎

Why I Bought at Walmart and What Does It Say About the Future of Retail

walmart-logo-wallpapers-a-e-ibackgroundz.comI wanted a bike rack for my Honda Fit. I was going on vacation and wanted to bring our bikes. I also, having worked many years in a family owned business, wanted to buy it locally. Sometimes it just isn’t possible. Here’s my story of how I ended up shopping at WalMart despite my very best intentions.

On the Friday, three weeks before heading out to Chautuaqua Institute ( a gem of a place by the way) I called Just Ride Along (aka Pete’s Bike Shop). Seemed like plenty of time. It is the nearest serious bike store and it is located in the next town over about 15 miles away. It is a locally owned shop that carries high quality biking equipment and provides full service. I wanted to buy just once, not have to install it myself and wanted something that was well made so Pete’s seemed like the right place. He is the only “real” bike shop for many miles.

I called, he had some Thules in stock. We discussed the issues and I learned that I needed to identify whether my hitch (which I also needed installed) was a 1.25 or 2″ ball. He had both size racks in stock so I just needed (or so I thought) to get the hitch installed. He said that he wouldn’t need to set one aside as he had plenty of them.

The following Monday I called Dixie Auto, a local garage that specialized in hitches and trailer. I had to leave a message for Fred. He managed to call me back on the following Wednesday and told me the hitch would be in 5 days and he could install it then. I thought, a little annoying that it took 2 days to call me back but no worries. It would make it in by Tuesday which would leave me plenty of time to get over to Bradford and pick up the rack  and have it installed before my Sunday departure.

Well it didn’t come in until Wednesday and I couldn’t get down there until Thursday to get the hitch on. Still no worries as I figured I could head over to Pete’s on Saturday. Which I did.

Only to find a hand written sign taped to Pete’s door noting that he was on vacation and he would be back in a week. Now I recognize that Pete chose a lifestyle not slavery but his closing his doors from January to March always seemed to fill that bill in my mind. What was a bike store doing closing during August?

Stranded, not sure what to do I discovered the nearest Thules were at least 50 miles away. Hmm.. frustrated I ran over to Walmart in Bradford and they had a Bell hitch mounted rack, with the right diameter in stock. $100 less. But I had to do the assembly myself. For me living better isn’t about saving money its about saving the frustration of self assembly and getting a durable product that will last forever.

OK. What choice did I have as I was leaving the next day? I can do it, I told myself. I took the sucker home despite Walmart being my absolute last choice of purchase location and started the assembly. No written instructions, pictures only and after I had made 5 mistakes on a 4 instruction process I managed to get it installed.

While I was sitting there assembling the rack, the lawn mower repair company (A1 Rental – who names their company A1 any more) that had taken 2 months to pick up my lawn mower and another one to fix it, delivered the repaired mower. Seemed ironic as I was cursing Pete. That is a story for another day but pick up and delivery is part of the reason that I use them. They just can’t seem to remember that I called (and called and called and called) and asked for a pick up….

Lawn mower in the garage and the bike rack on the car I decided to reward myself for a job well done and head down to the locally owned cupcake shop for some coffee. Upon arrival the sign on the door said: Closed. On vacation.

So why did I buy from WalMart when that was the last thing I wanted to do? Because they do what they do very well. So well that any local business has trouble competing.

They are open 24 hours (and they don’t go on vacation). They have great logistics and inventory control. Even though this Walmart is out in the weeds, they had the one thing I needed. They agreed to take it back if I couldn’t assemble it. In fact they agreed to take it back at the Walmart closer to my house. They were there when I needed the product and they were able to deliver it with reasonable return options.

If I had known the difficulties I would have run into I would have ordered the product from the other company that has their logistic and process act together (and better quality stuff), Amazon.

I used to run a local, family business. I know how hard it is. I don’t fault these local business folks for their vacations or their lack of rigor in their processes. But it is becoming increasingly difficult to stay ahead of the inventory, scheduling and logistic advantages that the WalMart & Amazons of the world enjoy. Despite my best effort to buy from a local shop, it will happen less and less.

Olean, with its 15,000 people, once was a retail mecca. Starting around the turn of the new century and perhaps before most of the old, post WW II retailers had retired, many businesses were shutting down from the pressures of WalMart and the big box stores and it got harder and harder to find a good local retail store.

The day of the small rural local retailer has passed. But I think that the issues that I confronted in my purchase are now affecting every retailer, everywhere. What was a rural phenomenon, the closing of retail shops is now going on in urban areas as well.

The urban bookstore was the first to go. But others are leaving as well. The day of the large retailer, the likes of Staples, Sears, KMart and Best Buy seem to be coming to an end. What has already happened in Olean will continue to work its way out in every city as retailers fail.

The advantages of scale, logistics, preferential vendor t & c’s, sale per employee etc that WalMart and Amazon have accrued due to their size will continue the consolidation. Retail businesses small and large will become fewer as the movement and sale of products is consolidated into the hands of a few that are truly expert at the processes needed to get products into the hands of consumers and take them back if they don’t work.

I suppose there could always be high end bike shops and local repair shops down the road but as the likes of Amazon & WalMart move into new market places even those will be threatened. And move into new markets they must. Every product in every category is a target for them and once they are done with that they will target the services. Consolidation has taken longer in the physical world than it took in the online world.

But it seems to be on its way.

LocalU Bootcamp at SMX – Sept 29th in New York

On September 29th, we’re rolling out a new classroom-style training event in conjunction with SMX East – Local U Boot Camp in New York City.

REGISTER WITH CODE WS-LUA10 FOR A 10% DISCOUNT

LocalU Bootcamp is the only workshop of its kind and provides the knowledge, processes and tools needed to help your business and the businesses of your clients prosper in Local Search. If you’re looking to develop a career in Local SEO or want to refine your current processes, this is the workshop for you. It’s also a great way to train new staff or cross-train existing staff in local search in one day. 

See full LocalU Bootcamp Agenda here.

You’ll enjoy a small group setting, concise presentations, plenty of Q & A time, complete access to the presenters, topic roundtables and the opportunity to speak directly with some of Google’s local team.

Join David Mihm, Mary Bowling, Will Scott, Mike Ramsey, Joel Headley and Ben Pavious and Abhishek Poddar of Google for this full day of learning.

If you’ve attended a Local University event in the past, you already know how valuable the knowledge you gain and contacts you’ll make at an event like this can be! 

We’re capping attendance, so register soon to avoid disappointment. 

 

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