Category Archives: Google Quality Guidelines

New Google Maps Business Listing Guidelines – What’s Changed


Google has changed much more than the order of the guidelines with this update. The guidelines are more rigorous and specific than they have been in the past.

I have noted in italics those sections which are completely new.

Previous
Listing Guidelines

Ordered to Match new Guidelines
New
Business
Listing Guidelines
& Order
Ownership
Only enter listings for businesses that you own or are explicitly authorized to represent. Only business owners or authorized representatives may claim their business listings on Google Maps.
Business
Name
Represent your business exactly as it appears in the offline world. The name on Google Maps should match the business name, as should the address, phone number and website. The business name on Google Maps must be your full legal business name.
Do not attempt to manipulate search results by adding extraneous keywords
into the title field,
Do not attempt to manipulate search results by adding extraneous keywords or a description of your business into the business name.
and do not include phone numbers or URLs in the title along with your proper business name. Do not include phone numbers or URLs in the business name.
Physical
Location
Provide information that best identifies your individual locations and provides users with the most direct path to your business.
Create only one listing for each physical location of your business. Do not create listings at locations where the business does not physically exist.
PO Boxes do not count as physical locations.
Do not create more than one listing for each business location, either in a single account or multiple accounts. Do not create more than one listing for each business location, either in a single account or multiple accounts.
Service area businesses, for example, should not create a listing for every town they service. Businesses that operate in a service area as opposed to a single location should not create a listing for every city they service. Service area businesses should create one listing for the central office of the business only.
Likewise, law firms or doctors should not create multiple listings to cover all of their specialties. Businesses with special services, such as law firms and doctors, should not create multiple listings to cover all of their specialties.
the precise address for the business in place of broad city names or cross-streets. The precise address for the business must be provided in place of broad city names or cross-streets.
A property for rent is not considered a place of business. Please create one listing for the central office that processes the rentals.
URL & Phone
For example, you should provide individual location phone numbers in place of central phone lines and the precise address for example you should provide individual location phone numbers in place of central phone lines Provide a phone number that connects to your individual business location as directly as possible. For example, you should provide an individual location phone number in place of a call center.
Provide the one URL that belongs to your business both in terms of the landing page and the displayed URL. Provide one URL that best identifies your individual business location.
Pages that redirect to another domain, or act as “click through” sites may lead to penalization Do not provide phone numbers or URLs that redirect or ‘refer’ users to other landing pages or phone numbers other than those of the actual business.
Custom Attributes & Description
Use the description and custom attribute fields to include additional information about your listing. This type of content should never appear in your business’s title, address or category fields. Use the description and custom attribute fields to include additional information about your listing. This type of content should never appear in your business’s title, address or category fields.
Please see this page of the LBC User Guide for examples of acceptable custom attributes.
Best Practices
Use a shared, business email account, if multiple users will be updating your business listing.
If possible, use an email account with a domain that matches your business URL. For example, if your business website is www.giraffetoys.com, a matching email address would be you@giraffetoys.com.
When entering categories, use only those that directly describe your business. Do not submit related categories that do not define your business. For example, a taxi company might properly categorize itself as “Airport Transportation”, but it would be inaccurate to also use the category “Airport”. Also, please use each category field to enter a
single category. Do not list multiple categories or keywords in one
field.

Google Maps Updates Business Listing Guidelines


Barry at SEORoundtable has just reported that Google Maps has just updated the Business Listing Guidelines.

Here are the new Guidelines:

Business Listing Quality Guidelines

Local Business Center Guidelines

Business Listings in Local Business Center must have correct information about physical, local businesses, as they appear in the real world. Google reserves the right to suspend access to Local Business Center or to other Google Services to individuals or businesses violating these guidelines.

Ownership

  • Only business owners or authorized representatives may claim their business listings on Google Maps.

Business Name

  • The business name on Google Maps must be your full legal business name.
  • Do not attempt to manipulate search results by adding extraneous keywords or a description of your business into the business name.
  • Do not include phone numbers or URLs in the business name.

Physical Location

  • Do not create listings at locations where the business does not physically exist.
  • PO Boxes do not count as physical locations.
  • Do not create more than one listing for each business location, either in a single account or multiple accounts.
  • Businesses that operate in a service area as opposed to a single location should not create a listing for every city they service. Service area businesses should create one listing for the central office of the business only.
  • Businesses with special services, such as law firms and doctors, should not create multiple listings to cover all of their specialties.
  • The precise address for the business must be provided in place of broad city names or cross-streets.
  • A property for rent is not considered a place of business. Please create one listing for the central office that processes the rentals.

URL & Phone

  • Provide a phone number that connects to your individual business location as directly as possible. For example, you should provide an individual location phone number in place of a call center.
  • Provide one URL that best identifies your individual business location.
  • Do not provide phone numbers or URLs that redirect or ‘refer’ users to other landing pages or phone numbers other than those of the actual business.

Custom Attributes & Description

  • Use the description and custom attribute fields to include additional information about your listing. This type of content should never appear in your business’s title, address or category fields.
  • Please see this page of the LBC User Guide for examples of acceptable custom attributes.

Best Practices

  • Use a shared, business email account, if multiple users will be updating your business listing.
  • If possible, use an email account with a domain that matches your business URL. For example, if your business website is www.giraffetoys.com, a matching email address would be you@giraffetoys.com.

Contact Us

For more information about the Local Business Center, please visit the Local Business Center user guide.

Google Clarifies Guidelines on Business Titles for Maps Listing


This post appeared yesterday in the Maps Help Forums in response to my poll and poll results as to how one should name a business for Maps:

Since we rolled out the most recent set of Local Business Center Quality Guidelines, we’ve seen a number of questions about which business titles are appropriate, and which are not. I hope this post will help clarify some of the confusion.

Our current guidelines state: “Represent your business exactly as it appears in the offline world. The name on Google Maps should match the business name.”

A recent post from Mike Blumenthal polled a number of different amalgamations of one business title, with the following results:

A. “Jones Brothers – Dallas Plumbing and Heating” unofficial name with tag line on web & literature
B. “Jones Brothers” official name
C. “Jones Brothers – Plumbing and Heating” unofficial name on website & literature
D. “Jones Brothers – Plumbing and Heating” has a DBA or fictitious name filing
E. “Jones Brothers – Dallas Plumbing & Heating – Air conditioning, Emergency Repairs, Hot Water Heaters” unofficial name with tag line on web & literature

Of all the above choices, the ONLY acceptable one is the one labeled official name (Jones Brothers).

You could, of course change the title of your business, as we’ve known a couple business owners to do. You could officially become “Jones Brothers – Dallas Plumbing and Heating.” If another user flags your listings for violating our guidelines however, we should be able to verify this name change.

So where should the words “Plumbing and Heating” go? You should add them as a category.

Thanks,
Maps Guide Jen

Google Maps: Updated Quality Guidelines for Business Listing


Google rolled out updated quality guidelines today:

Quality Guidelines:

  • Only enter listings for businesses that you own or are explicitly authorized to represent.
  • Represent your business exactly as it appears in the offline world. The name on Google Maps should match the business name, as should the address, phone number and website.
  • Do not attempt to manipulate search results by adding extraneous keywords into the title field, and do not include phone numbers or URLs in the title along with your proper business name.
  • Create only one listing for each physical location of your business. Do not create more than one listing for each business location, either in a single account or multiple accounts. Service area businesses, for example, should not create a listing for every town they service. Likewise, law firms or doctors should not create multiple listings to cover all of their specialties.
  • When entering categories, use only those that directly describe your business. Do not submit related categories that do not define your business. For example, a taxi company might properly categorize itself as “Airport Transportation”, but it would be inaccurate to also use the category “Airport”. Also, please use each category field to enter a single category. Do not list multiple categories or keywords in one field.
  • Provide information that best identifies your individual locations and provides users with the most direct path to your business. For example, you should provide individual location phone numbers in place of central phone lines and the precise address for the business in place of broad city names or cross-streets.
  • Provide the one URL that belongs to your business both in terms of the landing page and the displayed URL. Pages that redirect to another domain, or act as “click through” sites may lead to penalization.
  • Use the description and custom attribute fields to include additional information about your listing. This type of content should never appear in your business’s title, address or category fields.

Google Maps announces Quality Guidelines & Reinclusion Option


Today Google Maps has introduced quality guidelines for business listings in the Google Maps. Google has also now provided a reinclusion option. Both are available via the Google Maps Help Center.

Quality Guidelines:

The following items outline practices that could result in your business listings being permanently removed from Google Maps. While they cover the most common practices to avoid, Google may respond negatively to other practices not listed here. If you have any question about whether or not a tactic is deceptive, we recommend you stand on the side of caution.

  • Represent your business exactly as it appears in real life. The name on Google Maps should match the business name, as should the address, phone number and website.
  • List information that provides as direct a path to the business as you can. Given the choice, you may want to list individual location phone numbers over a central phone line, official website pages rather than a directory page, and as exact of an address as you can.
  • Only include listings for businesses that you represent.
  • Don’t participate in any behavior with the intention or result of listing your business more times than it exists. Service area businesses, for example, should not create a listing for every town they service. Likewise, law firms or doctors should not create multiple listings to cover all of their specialties.
  • Use the description and custom attribute fields to include additional information about your listing. This type of content should never appear in your business’s title or address fields.

The guidelines are a first real indication of Google’s standards for defining a real business listing from a spammy one. Previously the only known criteria was the single location/single listing rule. However the guideline still offer some ambiguity as to what is spam and what isn’t. For example are affiliate florist’s phone numbers that are listed in local phone books like Superpages using local exchanges but having no actual address considered spam?

For the first time Google has made an authoritative statement about keyword stuffing of business title. This type of content should never appear in your business’s title or address fields. The word never indicates that it is a clear and unambiguous reason for being delisted but as I have found in the small business world there already is ambiguity as to naming of businesses. This reality creates a fairly broad area of both discretion for Google and unclearness for small businesses.

The reinclusion request takes on a certain confessional aspect with required self reflection and identification of the SEO firm that may have precipitated the problem.

Kudos to Google for clarifying their rules and creating an opportunity for reinclusion when appropriate. These rules provide much clearer guidance about what can and can not be done.