Category Archives: Google Places (Maps & Local)

Comments, research and information about Google Maps (Google Local)

Google Announces Fix to Closing Report Issue

This update was posted late yesterday on the Google LatLong Blog post about Combatting Spammy Closed Listing Labels on Google Maps

Update 9/14/11 at 6:26pm (PST): As promised, we’ve recently made a change to our process of displaying when a business has been reported to be closed on its place page. More specifically, we have removed the interim notification about a report having been made so that a listing will only be updated after it has been reviewed by Google and we believe the change to be accurate.

The good news is that Google will only report out a business as being closed after it has been reviewed by Google. There will no longer be the interim message of “Reported to Be Closed”.

The questions remains as to whether an email will be sent to a claimed business and what signals and how Google will actually close the business. But on average it appears to be a solution moving in the right direction.

Here are previous articles with a timeline on the topic for those of you just catching this story:

Date  Source  Article
 9/14  This blog  Google Places: Now Permanently Closed with 2 clicks – Its Getting Worse NOT Better
 9/6  This blog  NY Times: Closed, Says Google, but Shops’ Signs Say Open
 9/6  Lat-Long Blog  Combatting Spammy Closed Listing Labels on Google Maps
 9/5  NY Times  Closed, Says Google, but Shops’ Signs Say Open
 8/16  Google PR/Joey  Clarification re: Clarification re: closed listings on Google Places
 8/15  This blog  News Flash: Google Mt View Reported Closed!
 8/15  This blog  Places Blackhat Playground – Reported To Be Closed

 

 

 

 

 

NY Salons have a Bad Hair Day in the Google 7-Pack

Bad is a word that is used in many contexts in the English language. It can mean anything from terrible to awesome used by iteslf and there are many phrases that integrate the word for totally different meaning altogether. Bad boy, bad ass and a bad taste to note a few. This is particularly true with hair. A “bad hair day” for example has been elevated to the level of cliche for getting the day off on the wrong foot.
Bad hair salon NY search
Now add to this linguistic mishegas the fact that Google is possibly doing keyword to category mapping.

In this process Google is apparently indexing keywords associated with a citation, mapping those keyword to their appropriate category and if there is enough searcher intent, showing 7-Pack or Blended results on those adhoc keyword related categories.

In the hair salon business this combination of linguistic “nuances” and keyword mapping leads to unintended outcomes. If you search on Bad Hair Salon NY, NY, which is unambiguous for most of us, it shows a seven pack and a ton of salons in Manhatten that are “bad”.

In that pack, I chose the first highly rated salon on that search, the Salon V, a 4.5 star rated establishment, to see exactly why it was so “bad”, why it showed in the results….When you further refine the search “Salon V” Bad hair NYC you see the types of ambiguous statements showing in the search results that may have lead to the results:

After 2 “bad hair” days I was ready to give up b. ..

I ended up running back to Salon V to correct a very bad highlight job.  I’ve had my haircut at many places in NYC, LA, and SF, but Salon V is definetly the best. 

THANKYOU CAROLEENA AT SALON V!!!!! So….I’ve had multiple bad hair salon …. A gem in NYC! Hawaii lost one of its treasures when Vernelle moved away a few 

Salon V of Fairfield, CT – Take advantage of the quality services, convenient location  went to Salon V for the first time (after several bad cuts at another salon) and I got a 

The take aways? Continue reading

Google Places: Now Permanently Closed with 2 clicks – Its Getting Worse NOT Better

Last Monday, the NY Times ran an article about how easy it was to mark businesses as either “reported to be closed” or “permanently closed” in Google Places. There had also been reports at the time that Google was actually sending out an email to claimed businesses that were marked as “permanently closed” although not to businesses”reported as closed”. The article in the Times occurred after months of reports of businesses being closed by competitors. Barbara Oliver & Co. Jewelry and Google in Mt. View both suffered the same fate (although for different reasons ;) ).

Shortly after the article appeared in the Times, Google apologized and noted that a fix was imiminent saying “These improvements will be implemented in the coming days”.

I was curious what “coming days” meant. This time, rather than experimenting on Google’s Places Listing, I experimented on my own listing at our main office in Bradford Pa. Yesterday at about noon and five, my listing was reported as closed. The first click was from my desktop in Olean and the second was from the DC area. Neither click was local to Bradford as my IP shows as Buffalo which is 70 miles away. (Update 11:30 I have just learned that my DC connection was asleep at the wheel and clicked the wrong business.) It turns out that this business was “permanently closed” with ONE CLICK.

Within 12 hours of the second report that the office was marked as “permanently closed”.  

It was not just marked as “reported to be closed” but “permanently closed” and no email notification was sent to the claiming business owner (me).

Things seem to have gotten worse NOT better. The listing did not enter an intermediate state of “reported as closed” and the business received no notification email.This is a business that has been claimed and active on Google Places long before it was known as Google Places. It is a business that has been at the same address since our founding in 2001.

Because I had been receiving so many media inquiries about the problem, I contacted Google last weekend to see if the problem had been fixed yet. I was hoping to be able to tell the media that Google had responded in the promised timeframe.

Here is Google’s response (bold mine):

I heard from Ethan that you’d inquired about the changes being made to our system to prevent malicious or incorrect labeling. We’re still working on the labeling improvements regarding this issue, and are constantly working on ways to improve our system on an ongoing basis.

Thanks for following up, and have a great weekend,
Deanna

Rant coming….

Continue reading

Small Business Alert: Google is from Mars and You are from Venus

The good folks from Artfibers, a prominent yarn store at 266 Sutter St. in San Francisco, CA, made this recent post in the forums:

 

I own one of the oldest and best yarn stores in San Francisco — Artfibers. Six months ago our name came up in a Google search “yarn San Francisco”. Now we do not. It seems that Google is determined to destroy our business. What can we do?

After several efforts by myself and another poster to help they proceeded to only get angrier at Google. I penned this response.

To seabright.nyle from Artfibers in San Francisco.

I understand that you are frustrated. I understand that Google Local results seem crazy and unpredictable to you and that you are angry. I understand that your time is limited but you feel compelled to explain all of this to Google. There is a reason for all of this:

Google is from Mars and most small business people are from Venus.

Let me explain.
Continue reading

Give Google Places Your Opinion!

Google has just rolled out another moderated forum where users can provide suggestions and opinions as to how to improve Google Places. Here is the full text of the announcement:

Ask us your Google Places for business questions

Thursday, September 8, 2011 | 10:51 AM

A little more than a year ago, we collected your questions and feedback on Google Places for business via a Google Moderator page. You sent us some great feedback, and we had a blast responding! Check out our video responses here on YouTube, covering things like features of a listing, Report a problem and ranking.

It’s important to us to continue hearing your great feedback — and we suspect you’ve had a lot of questions and ideas throughout the past year — so let’s fire up another Moderator page. Starting today and for the next two weeks, you can submit your questions and ideas, as well as vote up other submissions from users. We’ll answer some of the more popular questions directly on the page and post a new video or two to the Google Places YouTube channel.

Start sharing your ideas right now, and stay tuned to us here on the Small Business Blog to see a roundup of responses.

Whether this was in response to the NY Times article earlier in the week or not is open to conjecture. The article has generated over 108 user comments to date.

Regardless, kudos to Google for picking tackling the problems head on and working to improve Places more quickly.

May I suggest that you post at both the NY Times Comment Section and the Google Ask Us Your Places Question forum.

More Staff Changes At Google Places

Salahuddin Choudhary, who replaced Carter Maslan  as a Product Manager for Places for Business in early June, has announced his departure from Google on his Google+ stream. He had been a product manager at Google since 2007. He noted: “Had an incredible 4 years and can’t wait for some of the amazing launches team Google has planned”. Prior to working at Google Salahuddin was an engineer at Apple and notes on his profile that he remains an Apple Fanboy.

The public announcement of Carter’s resignation  from the position was on June 22. He joined Google in roughly the same timeframe as Salahuddin. He is now working on a new project, Camiolog, that will be “a video monitoring service that archives network camera imagery for smart notifications and easy viewing.”

While Carter was at Google, he was the voice of Maps/Places in the market Place. Not as present as we may have liked but accessible to interviews and available for show presentations. Salahuddin did not even have time to fill that role. Who will become the new public face of Google Places? It could use one.

NY Times: Closed, Says Google, but Shops’ Signs Say Open

Google Places Reported Closed - Not True?An article on the recent spate of black hat closing flags that have been appearing on Places listings was published in the NY Times today by reporter David Segal. He is the same reporter that broke the JC Penny’s link buying story.

The good news is that Google has promised a fix for the problem shortly:

A Google spokesman, Gabriel Stricker, declined to comment on whether the company kept a running tally of fraudulent closings. But he said Google was aware of the issue and was already working on changes, which will be adopted in coming days, to prevent what he called “malicious or incorrect labeling.”

Kudos to Google for acknowledging the need for acting quickly to put a stop to this pernicious activity.

The other good news is that both Linda Buquet and I were quoted/linked in the article. :)

Other articles of interest on the topic:

News Flash: Google Mt View Reported Closed!

Places Blackhat Playground – Reported To Be Closed

Clarification re: Clarification re: closed listings on Google Places

Hit by Competitor Spam Reviews: The Plot Thickens

Update: Thanks to Jim Rudnick, a Hamilton, ON SEO, for the heads up that Google has responded publicly to the NY Times article on the Lat-Long Blog.

High Ranking Local Results You Just Might Not Want

We all struggle to achieve high rankings in Google local. It is not clear exactly how hard these businesses have worked to achieve these high rankings.

With Google Local’s ability to parse sentiment, their ability to create business categories on the fly and their desire to serve man you often will find local results that you didn’t quite bargain for. In my research looking for review snippets I was exploring searches in NYC looking for extremes. I managed to get side tracked when I came upon the results for these local searches.

I have caputured the results in an animated slideshow for your viewing ease. One wonders just what Brooklyn based Sal The Plumber did to have Google designate him as the worse plumber in New York City (and a One Box no less):

Google Places: Growing Reports of “We currently do not support the location”

Update: One of the posters in the forum whose listing has gone into limbo noted that he just received the following email from Google:

Thank you for your patience during this entire process while working with me. We have been working on a technical issue that has affected many users. Unfortunately, it appears your listing has also been affected. This probably happened because your listing has gone through recent information edits and modifications. Have no fear however! We are aware of the incorrect information you emailed about and are taking steps to fix it. You should see the information appearing correctly within four weeks’ time. If, in four weeks, you are still experiencing this problem, please respond to this email. Thank you for your patience.

We currently do not support the location work around

Update 10:30 pm:

There have been reports in the German forums of a user making as many as five changes to the record before the listing came back from the dead. I think it as likely the quantity and repetiviness is as important as the specific action or the order but who knows. CAVEAT EMPTOR. Why this has happened is unclear as is the impact of multiple changes on the state of your listing.

In the German forums the user added an update two times, he then shifted the location marker once, he made a slight change to the categories and finally a major change to the categories. He save after each interaction and on the 5th one, the record reappeared.
As I noted, I have no idea why this happens or the impact it might or might not have. If you are the poking testing type and do make numerous changes please report back.

Update 11/2:

At least one user that attempted the more aggressive approach has reported lost reviews.

There are a growing number of instances in the forums of businesses reporting that their listing is not showing in Places and their listing, when accessed via the dashboard, displays the foreboding message “We currently do not support the location”. There have been over 30 reports of the problem in the last 3 days.

For some the work around for “We currently do not support the location” reported here last month has done the trick but for others their listing remains in Google limbo.

If your listing is showing the message try the work around. If you are unlucky and it doesn’t work, report the problem in this consolidated thread at the Forums that Google is tracking.

Adwords Express: Things that are Easy to Hate

I have a love hate relationship with the elegantly simple Google’s Adwords Express. One of the things I love is that for a business with more than 2 reviews and greater than an 4 star rating, it will show your star rating with the ad. One of the things I hate is that, unbeknownst to the business placing the ad, if the stars are clicked, it is a billable event and the searcher is taken to your Places Page NOT the web page that you had opted for when you purchased the ad.


On the Places Page, the searcher is subjected to seeing both additional ads AND a list of nearby competitors. Perhaps a reasonable trade off if the business was aware of the quid pro quo or could opt out, but neither is the case. Regardless it hardly seems reasonable that a business should be paying for the privilege of showing a searcher additional ads on Google.

There are a number of other issues I have with the practice besides the indignity of paying to have users to see more ads and learn about your competitors:

1- There are no analytics of the event. It is impossible to see how many ads that were clicked went to the Places Page instead of your website thus it is difficult to asses the value of the ad. A click on the stars shows in the Places analytic as an action and exactly the same as a visit to your website.
2- A corollary to the above is that there is no ability to track the campaign accurately. Since the click never makes it to your website there can be no measurement of conversions or goals in Analytics or the value of the click.
3- There is no indication in the Help files that you are paying when a user clicks on the star. I had to confirm the practice by contacting Google.
4- More importantly, as most Express users do not make it to the Help files, there is no indication in Places that your ad will show your review stars or that a click on them is billable.
5- When you place the ad, there is no indication that the user might be sent to your Places Page even though you explicitly selected the option for sending the user to your web page.
6-If a business has no reviews or a low star rating they are not paying this extra fee. How is that fair? Only better businesses are thus taxed?

With Adwords and location extensions you have the option to enable clicks to call. You pay if the searcher does in fact call. That is a reasonable option in that it is both a choice to turn it on or not and it is an event that is measurable and likely to lead to a conversion.

The other Adwords case where Google will show review stars is with the seller ratings extensions option. In that case you are also “automatically opted in to showing seller ratings with your ads”. (Where is a good copywriter when we need one? Does “opt” not mean choice? Oxymoronic at best.) In this seller ratings case however, when the searcher is taken to the product reviews, it is not a billable click. While it may disrupt your purchase funnel, the pros seem to outweigh the cons.

While a review highlighted Adwords Express ad is more visually attractive, the total lack of knowledge, control and tracking makes this one of those options that is easy to hate.