Does Business Name = Title Tag?

2)Enhance the title of the Business to include the key phrase(s)

As I have explored Google Maps local rankings, I have used the models developed for organic search optimization as a starting point to develop understanding and make progress.

The working theory I developed is that the business name created in the Google Business Center functions in much the same as a Title Tag on an html page and that it perhaps has priority over other methods of determining relevancy. Minimally it plays a role, that much is sure.

Google Local (Google Maps) Title Example
Note in this example how Google highlights the search phrase in the Business Name (title) phrase.

Google Maps though has a number of different ways to potentially determine relevancy of a page to a search. One of the most significant besides business name is categories. Since they are limited in number and any listing can only have five they could easily play this role. Description also seems to play a part in reinforcing the relevancy of the listing.

It is certainly conceivable that category and description are more important or equally important to title. My theory is though that they act more like body copy & headlines on a text page to reinforce the business listing name. Can anyone shed more light on this relationship?

From a marketing and branding standpoint, this can have implications. Should a business change its business name in some way to enhance its standing on Google Maps? Will Google at some point consider it spamming to do so?

I have taken the approach that by adding one or two key services to a business name you are probably ok on both fronts. This is an issue that needs to be addressed and perhaps discussed with a client prior to the listing.

Please consider leaving a comment as your input will help me (& everyone else) better understand and learn about local.
Does Business Name = Title Tag? by

8 thoughts on “Does Business Name = Title Tag?”

  1. I agree quite a bit with Mike’s comment. I have found this to be empirically true for the last 2+ years of listing companies. And I agree that the categories function more like body headers. Thirdly, the words listed in the description box are relevant and may correspond to description in the metatags.
    I believe there is even a logical explanation as to why Google works this way. I believe that the development of the “algorithm” Google uses is, at least, loosely, based on local search theory. When the computer reads through the company name, on the first day of the listing, its first assumption as to what the company is, is based on the words in the name. It then compares that conclusion with subsequent information presented in the categories and the description, to see if it is right
    For example, it’s possible that a remodeling company called Rose Services would be classified as a flower shop if it failed to provide any more information in its listing!

  2. Just an addendum to what I wrote above. I work with my clients to judiciously add words to their name, and at this point my success rate of getting first page listings on Google Local, even on the first day, is 100% In the few cases, where my clients were not happy with the keywords they came up on the first night; we found that they came up on page 1 on some desired searches within several weeks, (after Google’s next monthly relook at their data I’ve detailed my rather primitive, yet very effective strategy in a little e-Book entitled ” Getting Your Business on the First Page of Google Local in 4 Hours or Less.” http://www.wexpresssubmit.biz/submissionebook.htm
    In defense of what some might call a thrill seeking approach to Google Local submission, I submit a carefully selected group of keywords in the Description Box, which keeps my clients moving up for a good while.
    The real question worth thinking about, in my mind, is one of effectiveness versus aesthetics. As you add more words to a company title, do you potentially decrease the company’s listing appeal. And so, at what point, if ever, are the listing’s increasing number of impressions counteracted by a decreasing rate of clicks? I have yet to see any discussion on this question.

  3. Hi Baruch

    Great comment. I am not sure that any one reads this far back besides me (an obviously you).I have a question. You said:

    I believe that the development of the “algorithm” Google uses is, at least, loosely, based on local search theory.

    Or did you mean local or general search theory?

    Mike

  4. The real question worth thinking about, in my mind, is one of effectiveness versus aesthetics. As you add more words to a company title, do you potentially decrease the company’s listing appeal. And so, at what point, if ever, are the listing’s increasing number of impressions counteracted by a decreasing rate of clicks?

    The issue goes beyond aesthetics into compliance with Google Guidelines and possibly abuse. If you go too far you run the risk of being banned so first question is: Is the name a legitimate representation of the business that can withstand scrutiny? It is not worth getting called out on as spam by a competitor and being banned by Google.

    Beyond that the question is good but would require testing to know the limit.

    Mike

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